58
kiki
20d

It was only a while ago that I realized that “firm” was not quite “hard”, but also not “soft”, hence “firmware”, it's in between hardware and software.

Comments
  • 12
    Mind blown 🤯
  • 2
    @Lensflare yeah it just clicked, and I can't un-think it
  • 14
    Then WTF is tupperware?! lol
  • 5
    @Demolishun “tupper” literally means “moron” in russian
  • 1
  • 7
    Mind you, this is the industry that calls 4 bits a nybble
  • 0
    @lorentz for real?
  • 1
    On my way to put some hardware in wetware.
  • 2
    @electrineer my bluetooth-enabled vibrator loses connection when it's in
  • 3
    @kiki it stops working because the hardware turns into software.
  • 2
    it was right now for me, thanks to this post.
  • 5
    Microsoft was founded to write software for microcomputers (as opposed to mainframes/supercomputers?). But now those "microcomputers" are many times more powerful than the mainframes/supercomputers from back in the day they were founded..
  • 10
    Flaccidware
  • 0
    @iiii bait and switch ware... 8 second heros
  • -1
    Microsoft was founded to write software for microcomputers (as opposed to mainframes/supercomputers?).
  • 0
    @red- aaaaaaa pun
  • 0
  • 1
  • 0
    @Root hi, notice the wordplay pls, have a nice day.
  • 1
    @kiki Might want to ask Hans Niemann for tips on rc vibrators with good reception
  • 0
    @lorentz ethernet always wins
  • 0
    @kiki plug and play?
  • 0
    @hjk101 joy stick ☺️
  • 2
    @kiki well I hope Tupperware stays dumb. If we get smart reusable containers I’ll be going to live as a Luddite in the desert. Smart fridges were already a bridge too far
  • 2
    @lorentz @kiki I've only seen it spelled nibble, but yes it is a real term. It's not "four bits" but more accurately, "a nibble is half a byte"
  • 1
    @AlgoRythm My professors spell it with a y, and that's how the pun works out.

    A nibble is a small bite

    A nybble is half a byte
  • 2
    @lorentz most common is nibble but there are others

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

    It's a joke data structure anyways because it really isn't useful in any manner considering most modern processors won't address anything less than a byte.
  • 3
    How about an imperial unit?
    A byttle could be 0.871053 byte.
  • 1
    @Lensflare metric would be 10 bits per byte. Cause math is hard. Or would it be 10 states per bit?
  • 4
    @Lensflare 60 bytes would be a board. 153 boards would be a machine. 824 machines would be a server room.
  • 2
    @electrineer A networked machine would be 120 boards, but for the sake of brevity people who work in networking would just call it a machine regardless of who they're talking to. There would also be something called a Swedish machine, equal to 70.2[43](repeating) modern boards, which isn't really used today but the original technical documents of older systems would refer to it as a machine and the transition period would consist of three decades of old and new authors refusing to specify which one they're referring to and pretending that it is the only widely adopted interpretation as a microagression towards the opposite side.
  • 1
    @electrineer However, everyone throughout history would agree on the letter of the statement "824 machines make a server room." There would be no distinguishing names for the various units derived from this definition.
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